Wardsboro

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The town was settled about 1779 by Samuel Davis and his wife from Milford, Massachusetts. It was granted and chartered on November 7, 1780 to William Ward of Newfane, for whom the town was named Wardsborough, together with 62 others. In 1788, it was divided into north and south districts, the latter set off and incorporated in 1810 as Dover. Although the terrain is very uneven and in parts rocky, farmers worked the soil into productivity.

Mills were built along the brook, a tributary of the West River. In 1859, industries included three gristmills, six sawmills, one tannery, and a rawhide whip factory. During the Civil War, Wardsborough Center was called Unionville because of its strong Federal sentiment. In the 1880s, Jebediah Estabrook's tub, bucket and pail factory at Wardsborough Center was the area's principal employer. In 1894, the U.S. Post Office dropped the "ugh" from town names ending in "borough," so Wardsborough was thereafter known as Wardsboro.